Wade King: Find Your Classroom Creativity Wildcard

Wade King on episode 301 of the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

We can unleash our creativity as teachers if we want to inspire our students. Co-author of Wildcard, Wade King, shares how.

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Enhanced Transcript

The Wild Card: Find Your Creativity

Link to show: www.coolcatteacher.com/e301
Date: April 30, 2018

Vicki: I am so excited about this two-part series for Motivational Monday!

Not too long ago I was on Amazon looking at books like I do and I came across this awesome book that I had to immediately order. It’s called The Wild Card: 7 Steps to an Educator’s Creative Breakthrough, and I saw that Wade and Hope King wrote the book.

And so of course I got Dr. Lisa Durff, my wonderful research assistant to start looking, and she said, “You know what? Wade and Hope work with your friend Junior Bernadin who is at Ron Clark Academy!”

So, Wade, you have come on the show, and we are going to help motivate teachers to get excited about creativity in our classrooms.

Where do we start?

Wade: Yes! So excited, so excited! Thank you so much for having me on this. It is one of those where we are just pumped to share how we use creativity in the classroom for engagement.

So I love to start with, “What is your WHY? So focusing on — and reflecting on — WHY you got into teaching in the first place as a teacher.

What is your WHY?

A lot of us, as educators, we got into education for a particular reason and purpose but as you go through year after year after year, you kind of forget about why you became an educator in the first place.

So reflecting on that is absolutely essential to what you do in your classroom. You cannot be creative if you do not know why you want to be creative and who you’re doing it for.

Vicki: So important. Isn’t it though, easy when… I mean everybody can fall into a rut, right?

Wade: Absolutely, absolutely.

I always, when I talk to educators, I always say, “It is easy to remember your WHY you got into education when it’s the beginning of the school year because you’re coming off the summer break and you’ve been looking on Pinterest or on Instagram, getting all these great ideas.

But then February comes…

Vicki: (laughs)

Wade: … and then March comes, and you get so bogged down.

So kind of reminding yourself of that and finding people who hold accountable to that. We all have a different reason of why we got into education, a different purpose.

Remind yourself of your WHY in February and March

I like to tell teachers, “Yes, it is great that you love kids, but that’s not enough. Why do you love kids? Why do we do? Why do we wake up when it’s dark outside and some of us actually go home when it’s dark outside. So why do we put ourselves through that?”

Well, it’s for our kids, but what do our kids need?

And so focusing on that — yes, you definitely get burnt out. But it definitely helps you when you think about, “Okay, what am I doing this for? Really, really… what exactly is my reasoning for why I want to push myself to the limits and create an engaging environment for my students?”

Vicki: OK. So we understand our why. We also know why I am going to go all this effort to make an exciting classroom, because that’s also a why. Some people phone it in, but we don’t phone it in because we want to be remarkable.

So, what’s next? How can we get motivated to pull that creativity into our classroom after we know our why?

Wade: Right, I love this question. Because a lot of people put creativity in a certain box — this is what has to look like.

My wife Hope and I — we obviously teach together here at the Ron Clark Academy. We have taught together even in public school. But her creative aspect is totally different than mine is.

When we started to look and see the monotony, kind of, in our classroom… We started to reflect… number one, on our interest. So what makes us excited?

And then we started to look at the kids. What are they interested in?

Build off of the students’ interests as well as your own

For example, when I taught fifth grade math back in Pendleton, South Carolina, my girls loved Hannah Montana. Absolutely adored Hannah Montana. And so what I would do is I would literally go to Hope’s mother’s house, sit in the recliner, and watch “Hannah Montana,” just so I could pull into those interests of my students.

So why did I do that? Well, I did that because as my students coming to the class, they were still giving me effort, but I could see it on their faces that it was just another day.

And that was the start of really, really honing in on creativity. I to play music in my classroom I love to use debate. Hope, she is very crafty. Her room looks like Hobby Lobby threw up all over the place.

Vicki: (laughs)

Wade: (laughs) and that’s just because she loves hands-on lessons. Loves crafting. That is her creative aspect. And throughout the years, she’s really focused on that.

There was a study done. I read in this sports magazine article over a decade ago, and they were talking about how much productivity you can have in your profession if you incorporate your interests.

Vicki: Hmm.

Wade: They’re not even talking about talents.

If you think about that, if you are interested about something, you are going to be excited about doing it.

And so we have to think about that — yes, we can be selfish a little bit if we’re teachers. We’ve got to think about that for ourselves. What are you interested in as a teacher? How do you incorporate that into the classroom?

And the same goes for our kids. If they’re not interested, they are not engaged, and they really aren’t going to give you their best effort. And so focusing on that and integrating those interests in your classroom — that is the beginning of understanding who you actually are and that reflective process of obtaining that creative breakthrough.

Vicki: And we want them to be interested, don’t we?

Wade: Absolutely. Oh my goodness, you have to.

You have to make learning relevant. If learning is not relevant for your students, no matter what it is, they are not going to be excited about it.

“But I’m not an actor… I’m not a performer…”

That is just — people just say that we are not actors, and we are not this, and we are not that, but at the end of the day you are. That is your stage, every single day, to get your kids pumped up and excited about what you’re going present to them.

Vicki: You know, why not? It is so exciting when you get kids engaged! It’s so exciting when you get excited, and they get excited. I mean, it’s almost like if you’re an adrenaline junkie, teaching is the perfect profession for you because you can really have an adrenaline hit when you have an awesome class, can’t you?

Wade: Absolutely.

Hope says it best, and we reflect on this a lot.

Like, if you are at a concert or something at front of the row giving it all you got, just hoping that that performer looks at you and gives you a wink or a high-five — that’s how we should want our kids to be in the classroom, too.

A wink from the performer can go a long way

When the performer sees that, the performer is going to get more amped up, and more excited. So the more you pour into your kids, the more excited you are about learning, the more you share information with enthusiasm, the more you are going to be excited about it because you are going to feed off back and forth from each other.

So being able to do that can definitely liven up your classroom to help ignite that creative aspect.

Vicki: So Wade, give us a 30-second pep talk to motivate us to really willing to bring creativity and bring own interest to our classroom.

Wade’s 30-second pep talk

Wade: You all, we wake up when it’s dark outside. We go home when it is dark outside.

A lot of us as educators, we spend more time consciously inside of our classrooms during the school week.

We have got to be excited about walking into our classrooms, just as our kids are excited about walking into our classrooms.

We do a fantastic lesson. Now, do fantastic lessons have to cost us a lot of money? Or a lot of effort? No! Just be different!

If all you do is play music every single day in the classroom, even that gets old.

You all, I am not a technology person, but if I were to use technology tomorrow to do something as simple as quizzes? Oh my gosh, my kids would be blown away!

We have got to start thinking differently to ignite that passion because at the end of the day we have human beings in our classroom who potentially will change the world one day.

Vicki: I love it.

So educators, creativity is definitely a part of being remarkable. Not only our creativity, but the true creativity of our students, and not just here’s a list of twenty things — you pick one. We’re talking about truly letting them create and invent and do remarkable things.

So the book is The Wild Card: 7 Steps to an Educator’s Creative Breakthrough by Wade and Hope King.

Check out next Monday. We will be talking to Hope!

Contact us about the show: http://www.coolcatteacher.com/contact/

Transcribed by Kymberli Mulford kymberlimulford@gmail.com

Bio as submitted


Wade King serves as the director of curriculum and instruction at the famed Ron Clark Academy, where he also teaches social studies and current events, co-author of the best seller The Wild Card 7 steps to an educators creative breakthrough, and featured presenter and director of the Get Your Teach On Conference.

His personal passion is using music and debate to drive engagement in the classroom—over 20,000 visiting educators who’ve observed his teaching methods remember Wade as the teacher with the electric guitar and drum set.

Prior to teaching at RCA, Wade was recognized in Anderson School district four as a District Choice Teacher, Pendleton Elementary Teacher of the Year, as well as Region Coach of the Year. Wade is a graduate of T.L. Hanna high school and earned both his undergraduate and masters degrees from Anderson University where he also wrestled for the Trojans.

Blog: setthestagetoengage.com

Twitter: @wadeking7

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” This company has no impact on the editorial content of the show.

The post Wade King: Find Your Classroom Creativity Wildcard appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog http://www.coolcatteacher.com/e301/

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5 Googley Ways to Celebrate Poetry Month

Eric Curts on episode 300 of the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Eric Curts gives us five ways to use Google apps, extensions and tools to celebrate Poetry Month. From blackout poetry to rhymefinding extensions, learn about some tools you can use all year long in your language arts classes.

Advancement Courses has more than 200 graduate level online PD courses for K-12 teachers. Go to advancementcourses.com/coolcat and use the code COOL20 at checkout for 20% off any course.

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Enhanced Transcript

5 Ways to Celebrate Poetry Month

Link to show: www.coolcatteacher.com/e300
Date: April 27, 2018

Vicki: Today we’re talking with my “Mr. Google” friend Eric Curts. He knows everything about Google, but also we’re talking about poetry because April is Poetry Month.

So today we’re going to do five ways to celebrate Poetry Month.

Eric, what is our first way?

Eric: Yes, absolutely.

First thing I’m going to mention is that everything I’m going to share here can be found in a blog post I did recently at http://www.controlaltachieve.com/poetry. So you guys can find everything right there.

The very first one is Drag and Drop Magnetic Poetry with Google Drawings.

Drag and Drop Magnetic Poetry with Google Drawings

I think most of us are familiar with those magnetic poetry kits you can get. Well, this is a digital version of that. Basically, what I’ve done is I’ve used Google Drawings to put little text boxes on either side of the Google Drawing canvas.

On the left-hand side, there’s about a hundred Dolch words, just your normal words there.

Then on the right-hand side, I’ll put themed words. I’ve got one for Wintertime, one for Springtime. I’ve got one for Valentines Day.

I’ve got several of those in the blog post, and people can make copies of those, and the students can simply drag and drop those tiles over from the sides onto the canvas to make their poetry.

I’ve even had some folks make copies of these and then modify it with their own themed words — which is fantastic. I always encourage people to take the stuff and make changes to it.

Vicki: What age do you think these are perfect for?

Eric: You could definitely use these with your elementary students without a doubt. I don’t think there’s any upper limit to it.

The idea is that since the words that I chose are the Dolch words, the first about hundred or so are those words — those are definitely words that students are learning in K-1-2. You could definitely use this with your lower elementary students.

That way they can simply drag the words over and not have to worry about how to spell things. But if they want to go further, they sure can. They can double-click on any word and change it.

There are a few blank tiles so they can add their own words in as well. So it definitely scales up for upper elementary and for middle school kids as well.

Vicki: How fun! OK, what’s next?

Eric: The next one is Random Writing Prompt Generators with Google Sheets.

Random Writing Prompt Generators with Google Sheets

Sometimes that’s the hard thing, just getting started. What should I write a poem about?

So what I did was I used the “random” function inside of Google Sheets to create two different writing prompt generators.

The first one is text prompt generator. I took 2,000 adjectives and 1,000 nouns and put them in the Google Sheet. Every time you pull it up, it randomly puts the adjectives with the nouns and gives you 20 suggested writing prompts at a time. You can always refresh it and get 20 more.

If that doesn’t work for you, I did another one that is an Emoji Writing Prompt Generator. Again, I took hundreds and hundreds of emojis. It randomly puts them together — into either 2, 3, 4, or 5 emojis at a time, depending upon what you want.

Again, this can give that spark of creativity to the students to say, “Ahhh! I’m going to write a poem about something.” They can refresh this until they get three emojis that just hit them just right, and then they’ll use that for the foundation of their poem they’re going to write.

Vicki: Because as we know, sometimes if we just say, “Write something creative,” — OK, they really need help! (laughs)

Eric: That’s right!

Vicki: … spurring it forward… OK, what’s our third?

Eric: The next one is Blackout Poetry with Google Docs.

Blackout Poetry with Google Docs

Now a lot of people are familiar with Blackout Poetry in the analog version, where you take a page out of a magazine and a big black Sharpie marker and you cross out everything you don’t want. You leave behind just the words you want to make your poem.

Well, this is just a digital version of that using Google Docs.

Basically, it’s just a couple of quick tricks. You basically start by putting your text into the document that you’re going to share out with the students, or they can put their own text in there. Then you do three main things.

First of all, you turn the background of the Google Doc grey temporarily.

Then second, you use the highlighting tool to highlight the words you want in white, so they kind of pop out.

And then after you’ve highlighted the words you want to keep, you then change the background color a second time, but this time you change it to black. Everything else disappears except for the words you highlighted white.

Now you have Blackout Poetry done digitally.

Vicki: What fun! OK, what’s our fourth?

Eric: The fourth thing are poetry templates.

Poetry Templates

Again, sometimes it’s helpful to give a little structure.

Now this could be for students who are struggling with writing a poem and they need something to guide them through.

Or it could also be on the other end. If you’ve got a student who is very successful with their writing, but needs to be challenged to be creative and fit it within a certain structure.

So I’ve got a couple of these templates.

One is the standard Haiku template, which is going to be your 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables. This is a Google Drawing template, where there are boxes for each of the syllables for them to put them in. But as a fun little twist, I also have an image in the background that the students can change to match whatever their poem is about.

The second template I have is what I call a Pi Poem template. Now this one’s in Google Sheets. That’s Pi as in P-I, the mathematical number pi. And the way it works is that you’re trying to write a poem where each word corresponds in length to each of the digits in Pi.

So the first word of the poem is three letters long. Then the next word is one letter long. Then the next one is four letters long. This is a template created in Google Sheets that will guide the students through that as they try to write a Pi Poem.

Vicki: Oh fun! And you’re pulling math together, aren’t you?

Eric: Absolutely.

Vicki: Fun! OK, what’s our last one?

Eric: The final one is an add-on that you can use in Google Docs called Rhyme Finder.

Google Docs Add-On called Rhyme Finder

With all of the activities we’ve been looking at here so far, what if a student gets into them and still is stuck and is still struggling to come up with, “What’s a good rhyme for this word?”

Well, there’s an add-on for Google Docs called Rhyme Finder. All you have to do is open up the add-on, highlight any word in your document, and Rhyme Finder will then find for you all of the rhyming words and list how many syllables they have, just to give you an inspiration if you’re getting stuck when you are trying to create that poem.

Vicki: You know, I’ve been writing poetry since I was very young. And yes, we’re using all these tools, but do we still want to share poetry and help capture just the beauty that poetry is?

Eric: Absolutely. And when you talk about sharing, don’t forget that with everything we’ve been talking about here with creating these, the final products can be shared.

If it’s Google Drawings, they can download it as an image, and that image can be put on your class blog or emailed out. Or if it’s using the Google Docs Blackout Poetry, that final document can be shared with the regular share button, or again, it can be published to the web.

And that’s the thing. Once these are being created, and they’re being done in a digital format, I would absolutely encourage people to share what the students have created, and let it go beyond the classroom to a broader, more authentic audience.

Vicki: Yes! Because you know… poetry can be so much about the power of the perfect word. It’s such an activity that helps kids understand just the meaning, and even selecting the perfect word, you know?

Eric: Absolutely. Those who appreciate poetry, when you do take a look at the blog post, I actually wrote a poem for the blog post. I’ll leave that up to people to go check that out.

Again, it’s at http://www.controlaltachieve.com/poetry where you’ll find all five of these activities and tools, linked in with the descriptions on how to use each one of them and links to get copies of all the templates I mentioned.

For the introduction for this, I figured, “Hey, I can’t write a post about poetry if I don’t write a poem.”

So I know just what you mean. I struggled and labored over that poem (laughs) to get it just right. But it introduces the blog post and kicks that off in a fun way.

Vicki: So, remarkable educators, Eric Curts is such a valuable resource. I know he is for me in my classroom.

I know that you’ll get in there and enjoy and celebrate Poetry Month and publish it when you’re done!

Thanks, Eric!

Eric: Absolutely. Thank you so much!

Contact us about the show: http://www.coolcatteacher.com/contact/

Transcribed by Kymberli Mulford kymberlimulford@gmail.com

Bio as submitted


Eric has been in education for 25 years, and is currently serving as a Technology Integration Specialist for the Stark Portage Area Computer Consortium in Canton, Ohio where he oversees Google Apps for Education implementation, training, and support, as well as online learning and other technology integration initiatives.

Eric is an authorized Google Education Trainer and a Google Certified Innovator and provides Google Apps training to schools, organizations, and conferences throughout Ohio and across the country.

He is a co-leader of the Ohio Google Educator Group (GEG) at tiny.cc/geg-ohio and runs the award-winning blog www.ControlAltAchieve.com where all of his Google Apps and edtech resources can be found. Eric is married with four children.

Blog: http://www.controlaltachieve.com/

Twitter: @ericcurts

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” This company has no impact on the editorial content of the show.

The post 5 Googley Ways to Celebrate Poetry Month appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog http://www.coolcatteacher.com/e300/

Building a Classroom Community by Having Parent Parties

Dr. Tisha Shipley on episode 299 of the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Engage parents any time of the year with these strategies. Parent parties are fun, exciting ways to help parents and improve relationships. You can do this any time of the school year.

Advancement Courses has more than 200 graduate level online PD courses for K-12 teachers. Go to advancementcourses.com/coolcat and use the code COOL20 at checkout for 20% off any course.

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Enhanced Transcript

Building a Classroom Community by Having Parent Parties

Link to show: www.coolcatteacher.com/e299
Date: April 26, 2018

Vicki: Today we’re talking to Dr. Tisha Shipley from Ashford University about building family relationships and having parent parties.

So, Tisha, what is the secret for building effective family relationships within your classroom?

What’s the secret?

Tisha: I would say that the secret to building effective relationships is to start before you even meet them.

So I liked to send out a postcard. We know that snail mail — it’s starting to become extinct, but today I would still send out a postcard welcoming that family to my classroom.

The next thing I would do is make a phone call home. I think both of these are two things that you can do before you even meet them to show that you care, to show that you want to build that relationship, and to show that you back what they believe, and that you care about their child.

Vicki: So we want to connect before. What happens when a student starts in the middle of the year? How do we build that relationship? We don’t really have an opportunity to kind of set the stage before they walk in the classroom.

What about students who join in the middle of the year?

Tisha: Most definitely. And this happens all of the time.

So my favorite thing to do was to invite the family the day that the child got there to invite the family as soon as they could come in to have a night with me after school.

So that I could show them around the classroom, so that I could introduce them to the principal and so that they could get to know me. It doesn’t matter if it’s the first day of school or if it’s after Christmas. I still want begin building that relationship, because when you have that relationship at home with your families, they’re going to support everything that you do in your classroom. They’re going to give you ideas, because they know their child best.

Vicki: So you’re really talking younger grades, here, though, right? What grades?

Tisha: Most definitely. My expertise is Pre-K to 3rd grade, but I think that this all the way through high school. You just have to implement it differently. You have to think outside the box, how can you get your families involved where they care and know that you care about their child just like they do.

Vicki: Now so many teachers feel overworked. And they’re like, “Oh my goodness! Tisha, you’re just adding something else to my list! How am I going to have time to do this?”

What’s your advice?

How is a busy teacher going to find time to do this?

Tisha: Well building community should start from Day One, and it’s something that you’re teaching right along with your curriculum. So it shouldn’t be anything added. Because classroom community is differentiating for each child, just like we do anyway. Making sure that they know the rules, and the transitions, and the expectations, and the policies, and the procedures.

Once you teach all of these things, then your curriculum happens automatically. Everything runs smoothly like a well-oiled machine. If you have a substitute teacher, they come in and your community is already built.

So, you really don’t have to do anything extra. It’s that differentiation it’s that building that community of learners that’s engaged all the time.

Vicki: OK. So Tisha, let’s say a teacher’s new to this. It’s kind of the middle of the school year, and it’s a disaster. It’s not going like it needs to.

What do you do? Can you reboot?

If the classroom community is a disaster, do you start over again?

Tisha: Yes. I think you definitely do. I think you do this every single day. We all know that we’ve been walking down the hall, and our procedures have been broken.

I like to stop. We turn around, and we start over. You have to do this every single day. After Christmas, you have to reteach your procedures.

I think right now is a great time to start parent parties.

That is a breakoff on your classroom community.

Parent parties can be started any time. I love to start them the first day, but why not start them right now? Teach them the classroom community. Teach them how you are supporting their students. Why are we teaching these procedures? Why are we doing these transitions? What can you do at home to help us?

And so yes, I think you start tomorrow. If you’re listening to this podcast right now, start tomorrow. Start that classroom community of learners. Go in. Start from Day One and teach your procedures again. Teach your transitions again.

Give each child a job to perform as they come into the classroom. What is their responsibility in that classroom community? How can you get that child involved?

And that parent party is just another aspect to get the family involved into your classroom community.

Vicki: How would you define a parent party? Is that when you’re bringing in a parent, you know, or two parents, or however many parents — just at night? Or how does that work?

What does a parent party actually look like?

Tisha: Yes, a parent party — again, I like to start from the first day, but you can start it right now — you have a parent party once per month. The parents know the agenda — it has to be very organized. It has to be efficient. You always provide a snack of some sort, music, and fun.

When I say that, you bring the family in. You have a relationship building time. Everybody talks because it’s not just you the teacher building that relationship with the family. Each family member needs to build relationships with the other families in the classroom. That’s how you start beginning to build that community of learners and that community outside that then transitions into your classroom.

So at your classroom community party, it’s just parents. You have to have somebody that’s in another classroom playing games with students, showing a movie — that’s completely fine. But you have a strict agenda, and you stick to it.

So one month, you may have a guest speaker, like a dentist that’s in the community. The dentist comes in and visits with your families, and maybe gives a checkup to everybody. Or you send home family bags with healthy recipes, and you send home a meal with hamburger and different ingredients that go into it. So they’re always leaving with something, too.

And I like to do door prizes. So those are some things that you can do.

You also could teach a math concept. So one-to-one correspondence. I noticed when I was teaching, some of my parents didn’t know what that vocabulary was. They didn’t have that background. So I brought them in and taught them a simple thing like one-to-one correspondence. How do you teach your child this at home? What are we learning? What are we learning to write in school this week?

Those are some things you would do at your parent parties. I almost had 100% participation in these because when they come, they know it’s one hour long. They know that they’re going to eat. They know there’s going to be relationship building. There might be a guest speaker. There’s going to be a skill or concept taught that they need to be doing at home, and they really enjoy it.

What about families who cannot attend?

For the parents who can’t come to those? I always videoed them and put them on my YouTube channel, so that they could watch them later. You are going to have parents who have prior obligations or jobs that they have to go to, but you need to provide a way for them to watch that.

Vicki: So, Tisha, what kind of feedback did you get from parents? What did they say that they liked or didn’t like about these?

What feedback did you get from families about the parent parties?

Tisha: Well, obviously, time is a huge thing. I tried to make it at about 8:00 in the evening so they could go home, make sure that their family was fed, and try to have somebody there with their child. If not, they could bring them. They were just in another room playing games or something with another teacher. My teacher’s aide was in there, or I had a teacher come in and volunteer.

So that was a big thing. It was always the time. I tried to make a time that they could all be there.

The things they loved were my guest speakers. I brought in resources from the community that I thought would really help them — eye doctors, human resources, places they could get education, the dentist, veterinarians. It depended. You know, I always sent out a newsletter and I have social media, so I asked them, “What are some things you want to see at parent parties?” I think that parent feedback is important. They get to, like in your classroom community, give an idea. If you are doing that at your parent party, [they’re] going to want to come because they’re interested in the topic. So I think that’s very important. And they did like when I did that.

Vicki: OK. So, we have a fantastic idea for having parent parties and building those classroom communities.

And remember this: you can start any time you need to. We can reboot any day that we choose. If we wake up one day and realize our classroom is not what we want it to be, we do not have to take this for the rest of the school year. We can reboot. We can restart.

And if you’re struggling with those parents, then perhaps a parent party might be a great idea, because you know we’re all on the same team, and it’s all about educating the kids.

Contact us about the show: http://www.coolcatteacher.com/contact/

Transcribed by Kymberli Mulford kymberlimulford@gmail.com

Bio as submitted


Dr. Shipley is a the chair of the Bachelors of Arts in Early Childhood Administration Program and a full time Associate Professor as Ashford University. Dr. Shipley has written and published many articles and has social media to reach her students and families. She has been in Education for over 15 years and still has a passion for helping teachers, families and children. Her personal website where you can find her social media, other presentations and articles is: www.busyclassroom.weebly.com

Blog: http://busyclassroom.weebly.com/tishas-ideas-and-thoughts-blog-pages

Twitter: @tishashipley

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” This company has no impact on the editorial content of the show.

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