Determiners Exercise

Fill in the blanks with an appropriate article. Answers 1. A little tact would have saved the situation. 2. Of the three, opera, movies and… Continue reading
from English Grammar https://www.englishgrammar.org/determiners-exercise-3/

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What helps kids really learn

Andrew Stadel on episode 220 [A special encore episode] of the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

How do kids learn and remember? Teacher Andrew Stadel, @mr_stadel founder of the popular site estimation180.com, talks about this pursuit of learning in the classroom. This topic is his summer research topic. As you ponder the classroom, look at what you’ll research to become a better teacher.

Richard Byrne, author of Free Technology for Teachers, has some fantastic courses for history teachers and those wanting to learn about technology. Check out www.coolcatteacher.com/edtech.

Listen Now

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Enhanced Transcript

What helps kids really learn?

[Recording starts 0:00:00]

To celebrate the end of the first season of the Ten Minute Teacher Podcast on June 16th, we’re running a giveaway. The Dash and Dot robot wonder pack from Wonder Workshop Stay tuned at the end of the show for how to enter.

What really helps kids learn? Episode 86

The Ten-minute Teacher podcast with Vicki Davis. Every week day you’ll learn powerful practical ways to be a more remarkable teacher today.

VICKI: Several episodes back, one of our educators (see Dan Meyer www.coolcatteacher.com/e69 ) just went on and on about Andrew Stadel @mr_stadel

and his Estimate 180 website. www.estimation180.com But today, we’re actually going to talk about learning. So Andrew, I was just listening to a teacher talk the other day and they were frustrated. And they’re looking at these final exams and, yeah, there’s some kids who’ve mastered it but there are some kids who just don’t seem to be leaning the material. And I know that you are passionate about understanding what helps things stick into the mind

ANDREW: Yeah, I feel like I’m just getting on to the road of the beginning of my journey to really dive into the dive into the idea of what helps us learn as long term learners not only as adults but our students too and how can we support them in that. Creating and environment, creating activities and lessons and structures so that they thrive and also are able to remember the content that we teach.

I think right now, I’m going to say I’m at the beginning of my journey, there’s two books that I’m just kind of going back and forth with. One of the books is called Make It Stick, http://amzn.to/2rpqu3c there’s three authors on that; Peter Brown, Harry Roediger and Mark McDaniel and that’s just kind of learning the premise is pretty such the science of successful learning.

And then there’d David Sousa, I think is how you say his name, I could be wrong, and his is How The Brain Learns, http://amzn.to/2rpz4iI and he has a specific addition on mathematics. So as a math teacher by trade, just thought back of various time in my classroom when kids understand but will not remember a handout or a review packet or some worksheet because there’s really no meaning to it.

[00:02:00]

Yet they would remember the craziest things, if I told a story, I how I used math in life or for example, like you said in Estimation 180 I provided my students with visuals and ways for them to make sense of the world around them so I take pictures of things and ask them to estimate quantities or heights or distances. And I when I would show early estimation pictures at the beginning of the year and then I maybe use them a little bit later in the year or review – it was amazing, it blew my mind away that kids would actually remember some answers or be really close. And I was like there’s something there, there’s something that sticks.

And so, I’m a musician – two; music is a form of language and a way for people to communicate, find a communality. And I’m always amazed at how music strikes people differently and how it sticks with people. So as a musician may I’ll listen to the guitar tracks more than the vocals or the lyrics but yet for other people they listen to the lyrics more than me, yet it still sticks. You can’t memorize your favorite song on the first listen, it takes time, it takes repetition, it takes coming back to. And the more I’m reading and learning, it feel like education activities and learning and lessons need that idea that we have to kind of grapple with something at first, there’s something hooky there, you like it but you have to return to it.

You need practice on it, you need to be tested on it. So I’m listening to my favorite song and all of a sudden it stops. Could I continue that song on in my head, could I hum it, could I listen? The same kind of goes in education. Like, if the bell rings, could my students continue their thought process, could they continue making sense of what I was teaching that day in math? So that’s what I’m grappling with.

VICKI: So Andrew, as you wrestle with this, I mean, we know we need meaningful practice but memorization and boring routine – I mean, isn’t the word boring and the word memorized reviled in education right now?

[00:04:00]

I mean, some people really rebel against repetition. So how can we repeat without being boring? And do we have to memorize? I mean, sometimes we have to, right?

ANDREW: Yeah, it’s a good question. If we break those two words down, like, boring is totally relative, it’s objective. Memorization is more a matter of fact but think everybody’s brain is differently wired. So how do people memorize things more than others? It’s such a great question whereas something that I found was engaging to me might not have been engaging to my students, it might have been boring to them.

As educators, we could all sit around and joke like – you know, you hear it coming. Like, my hair could be on fire and no one is paying attention kind of thing. Like, we’ve all had those days. So in terms of memorization, yeah, I really want to know more about that because the more experience I got as an 8th grade teacher – multiplication facts were important to me that my students knew them but at the same time the more as I progresses in my craft of teaching it was like, well, what if my kids could just make sense of multiplying?

Like kids struggled with 12s, like that’s wired that kids struggled with 12s. It’s totally fine but then for some reason they were fine with 11s. So 5 x 11 kids would just go 55, great. So that can empower that kid to do that and I’d just say, “Look, add five more to that to get your 12th five and that makes it 60.” And that’s empowering and then hopefully that logic sticks and not the multiplication fact. I need to learn more.

VICKI: Yeah, the thing I’m hearing you say is that you’re trying different ways and I’m actually having a flashback, at the end of the school year I do anonymous student surveys, I’ll ask you, “What do you like best, what do you like least.” And one question where they say they like best, half of the class said, “I love it when you circle up, you tell stories and we have conversations.” And then the other half class said, “You talk too much.”

[00:06:00]

And it’s like, “Well which is it?” I think that we somehow think that we’re going to get 100% approval form everybody for how we do this repetition. And I think that’s unrealistic. I mean, do you or is it just me?

ANDREW: Yeah. I agree 100% and I’ve actually reminded myself of that when I do consulting, when I work with districts, teachers feel like I should come and present them with this overboard and yet we need repetition and we’re going to say, yeah, we’re not always going to have a high of engagement, we’re not always going to be people pleasers, we can’t please everybody. And I don’t think that’s what we need to get into it for.

VICKI: Yeah. And I always tell my students, you’re going to thank me when you’re 23.

ANDREW: I agree 100% that you can’t please everybody.

VICKI: But we don’t want to use that as a cop out either, I mean, I know teachers who are worksheet wonders and they just use worksheets. I mean, have your read enough, Andrew, to know that business as usual, worksheets as usual don’t work?

ANDREW: For the most part, yeah, I’ve scratched the surface on that one a little bit. So the short answer, yeah, I think I’ve read enough, I’m convinced enough based off the reading I’ve done. But I’m also convinced on the personal experiences I’ve had. There’s a time and place for it, though. It’s playing sports. Like if I’m at practice and a coach shows me how to do something then now on my own time I can go work on that muscle memory. There’s a time and place where playing basketball I had to go practice my free throws. But at practice, the coach would specifically help me with my form, how to release the ball, how to set the ball up, the same thing that happens in the classroom. Like, as teachers, we got to be in a position to kind of help students understand things or use critical thinking or problem solve and work on those mechanics face to face with them. And then there might be a time and place where it’s like, “Look. You just need to kind of do some ground work here, you got to practice a few things.”

[00:08:00]

And that is part of making things stick a little bit but it’s not the end all where you just hand out a worksheet and be like, “Yeah, do 50 of these and you’ll remember it.”

VICKI: Andrew, as we finished up, we’ve really talked about a lot of issues. This is almost like a conversation you and I might have if we were on the same school in the faculty teacher’s lounge about learning because these are things that we teachers talk about. But could you give a 30-second pep talk to those teachers who just feel like, “It’s the end of the year and have I actually taught anything?”

ANDREW: What gets you excited about what you teach? I tend to fall back on Simon Sinek’s Ted Talk and why do you want to wake up and get out of bed? So on Monday what gets you excited that you’re going to get up out of bed, go to school, greet your students at the door and teach them. And so that for me is what helps guide my work as a teacher and as a coach. And so I share the enthusiasm with other teachers and say, “What gets you excited? What are some things that you experience in your life that you’re excited about and you can share with your kids?”

And it’s amazing, like you said, you have a conversation or a story-telling opportunity with your kids and those stick and the learning will actually come out of it. So find stuff you’re excited about and share it with your kids.

VICKI: And, you know, teachers, teaching is a relentless pursuit of learning, it’s hard, it’s not easy. There are no easy answers. And I would just encourage you on this motivational Monday, what are you wrestling with now? What are you going to find your books on this summer? What are you going to look into so that you can be a better teacher in the fall because that, teachers, is what truly makes us remarkable?

On June 16th we’ll finish up Season 1 of the 10 Minute Teacher. So celebrate, we’ve partnered with one of my favorite robots for teaching coding, Dash and Dot form Wonder Workshop. Go to coolcatteacher.com/wonder and enter to win your very own Wonder pack form Wonder workshop and to learn more about how you can use Dash and Dot to teach programming to kids, aged, kindergarten and up.

Thank you for listening to the Ten-minute Teacher Podcast. You can download the show notes and see the archive at coolcatteacher.com/podcast. Never stop learning.

[End of Audio 0:10:27]

[Transcription created by tranzify.com. Some additional editing has been done to add grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. Every attempt has been made to correct spelling. For permissions, please email lisa@coolcatteacher.com]

Bio as submitted


Andrew Stadel is a Digital Learning Coach for Tustin Unified School District in California, working with secondary math teachers to use and implement technology in meaningful ways to enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics. Andrew is the creator of Estimation 180, www.estimation180.com, a website designed to provide students and teachers with daily challenges to help improve their number sense.

Blog: http://www.estimation180.com/

Twitter: @mr_stadel

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” This company has no impact on the editorial content of the show.

The post What helps kids really learn appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog http://www.coolcatteacher.com/e220/

5 Ways to Connect with Your Students Over the Break

Connie Hamilton on episode 219 [A special encore episode] of the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Today Connie Hamilton @conniehamilton gives us five ways to connect with our students over the break. This is the number two episode of 2017. Listen to it now and plan ahead for by picking one or more of these ideas.

The 40 Hour Workweek is a fantastic program with Angela Watson. Check out the program and learn more efficient ways to teach so you can work less and get more done.

Listen Now

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Enhanced Transcript

5 Ways to Hack Homework and Get Better Results

[Recording starts 0:00:00]

Stay tuned to the end of the show to learn how to figure out if my friend Angela Watson’s 40 Hour Workweek Club is right for you.

Do you want to start next school year ahead? Well, pick one of the five ways to connect with next year’s class and for the summer. This is Episode 95.

The Ten-minute Teacher podcast with Vicki Davis. Every week day you’ll learn powerful practical ways to be a more remarkable teacher today.

VICKI: So today, we’re talking with Connie Hamilton. @conniehamilton

She’s the author of Hacking Homework. http://amzn.to/2r6E1K9 But we’re actually talking about hacking your summer right now. Connie, you have five ways that we can connect with next year’s class over the summer. So how do we start?

CONNIE: Well, the first thing is to get a survey out to those kiddos as soon as possible. So if the school year hasn’t ended yet, get an interest survey out for students to find out what their likes are, what kinds of crazy pieces of information, tidbits that maybe the average person wouldn’t know. Collect as much information about students as possible. And try to keep it lighthearted and personal, not so much of the, you know, what are your goals for the school year kind of teachery stuff. But this is really a way to create some relationships with kids. It’s easy to do just kind of – paper pencil is one way you can do it, you can create a Google form and use a QR code; lots of different ways.

But first thing is, gather a survey so that you can get a lot of information about kiddos. Maybe you learn that – maybe you have a student that builds motorcycles. And so then you can use your summertime to look for ways within your natural curriculum to make connections to building things or problem-solving.

[00:02:00]

And so maybe when you get to a problem-solving section of your curriculum, you might go to that student and say; hey, when the bike doesn’t work, how do you go about fixing that? What is your process for solving that problem? And try to make some personal connections. So when you know what students’ interests are, you can look through that curriculum and try to find some of those connections.

VICKI: Fantastic. Because we have to relate before we can educate or innovate or create, or anything we try to do in our classroom. Okay, what’s next?

CONNIE: Next one is to set up a remind and invite students to take part of that. If you have younger students, invite parents so that this is a really easy way for you to make connections with one little click of the phone. So set up a Remind, https://www.remind.com/ and maybe you do a weekly countdown of, hey, we’re getting excited for back-to-school. Or, hey, we have this event that’s coming up. And that kind of leads me into the next one.

VICKI: Cool. Well, I actually use Bloomz www.bloomz.net for that. And it’s a fantastic idea to set that up. Instead of the first week, why not set it up a little early? I love that. Okay, what’s the next one?

CONNIE: So the next one is to set up just some times to get together in some places. And I think it’s really awesome to set up a little meet and greet or a gathering, something really casual, but off campus if possible. It’s fine to have kids meet on campus or at the school, but why not have younger kids meet at a McDonalds with a play land or at a local skate rink. Or if you have older students, maybe you find a place that has a really awesome lunch buffet and invite kids to come and have lunch with you a couple of times a year. So the reminders can set out through Remind or through – what did you say you use? Bloomz?

VICKI: I use Bloomz, B-L-O-O-M-Z. They have some similarities and differences, but it’s still just a tool to connect with kids.

[00:04:00]

CONNIE: Yeah. So super easy. Hey, don’t forget next Thursday; we’re meeting at such-and-such. We’re meeting at the park; I’m bringing popsicles. Or, hey, we’re meeting at the coffee. Just finding a place to have casual meetings. I think a lot of times, teachers try to – maybe, hey, let’s meet at the library; which is a great idea as well. And in this way, I’m just suggesting that maybe you make it a little bit lighter over the summer and just make your focus to be establishing relationships, and then you can make connections academically later.

VICKI: Oh, and, you know, some teachers are just listening to you, Connie, going; “I need my summer, I’m tired, you know?”

CONNIE: Yeah. Definitely. So do it once. Just do it once. And make it a place where you want to go anyway. So if you love Starbucks, then have it at Starbucks. If you have a favorite spot outside that you like to sit and enjoy the weather, make it there. Make it at a local park. Put it someplace that’s convenient for you and that you would choose to go anyway.

VICKI: Yeah. Okay, what’s our fourth?

CONNIE: Fourth one is going back to snail mail; sending out postcards. So while you’re gathering with the students, take selfies when you’re with them. And then it’s super easy to print out 4 X 6 photographs of those selfies. And those 4 X 6 photographs can serve as postcards. So you can send the postcard to students afterwards saying, hey, thanks; it was so great to see you, and can’t wait to see you again at open house. Or, thanks for stopping by, I really loved hearing about such-and-such that you told me. But I think students get so little mail in the mailbox. Everything is so digital these days. And especially the little kids, absolutely love getting a piece of mail with their name on it. So using snail mail. Postcards are cheaper than letters. So that’s why I suggest a postcard, and utilizing the pictures that you take, the selfies with the kids.

VICKI: Well, and you’re really talking about winning their hearts before the first day.

CONNIE: Yeah.

VICKI: That’s what you’re talking about; which does make your year go easier. I know the thought of work over the summer, but really it does if you’ve already got that relationship. Okay, what’s our fifth?

CONNIE: The fifth one is making phone calls. Making that connection, picking up that phone and just having a quick little conversation, or leaving a voicemail for students, but reaching out to them. Or if you have younger students, reaching out to their parents. And potentially setting up some reverse conferences where this parent is the one who tells you all about his or her child as opposed to you telling them all about how their child is engaging in the classroom. So I love it when teachers set up reverse conferences at the very beginning of the year or even the very end of the summer. And I know sometimes that that definitely can be a whole lot of time. So that might take some convincing of your administration to say, hey, I want to try something a little different here. But, boy, you want to talk about setting up a great rapport with families and parents right out of the gate to say, I just want to hear everything that you have to tell me about what’s so awesome about your child, and I’m going to take notes like crazy and use that throughout the year to make connections and make sure that I’m personalizing and differentiating for your student.

VICKI: Love that. And as we finish, I just want to add another little one. A lot of times, when I go to ISTE www.iste.org or conferences over the summer, I like to have a friend hold my phone and record a quick video and say, hey, I’m looking at this; I’m at this conference; I’m getting ready to teach you in the fall, and I’m really excited about this or that. And then sending them that video so they kind of get excited about what’s new or what’s different. I mean, there are so many creative ways, teachers, that you can really go into the school year ahead with a positive connection with those parents and kids.

[00:08:00]

And Connie has given us so many ideas. I just challenge you; try at least one, or try two, or you could go for all of these ideas. But pick a way to relate and a way to connect to these kids so you can start off the year ahead and make it a remarkable year.

This month, Angela Watson’s 40 Hour Workweek Club will open up for membership. And she only has two opencart dates a year. Now, I’ve been participating for a year and I have learned so much about classroom efficiency. But, it’s not for everybody. So I’ve got a link for you to a quick quiz that will help you understand if the 40 Hour Workweek Club would be right for you. Just go to www.coolcatteacher.com/quiz and take the quiz to see if the 40 Hour Workweek is right for you.

Thank you for listening to the Ten-minute Teacher Podcast. You can download the show notes and see the archive at coolcatteacher.com/podcast. Never stop learning.

[End of Audio 0:09:14]

[Transcription created by tranzify.com. Some additional editing has been done to add grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. Every attempt has been made to correct spelling. For permissions, please email lisa@coolcatteacher.com]

Bio as submitted


Connie Hamilton Ed.S. is a K-12 curriculum director in Saranac, Michigan where she has served the staff and community for the past 13 years. As a teacher, Connie taught various elementary grades and 8th grade ELA. As a national presenter, she provides professional development and coaching for teachers around many instructional topics such as questioning, assessment, literacy, and leadership.

Blog: http://www.conniehamilton.net/

Twitter: @conniehamilton

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” This company has no impact on the editorial content of the show.

The post 5 Ways to Connect with Your Students Over the Break appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog http://www.coolcatteacher.com/5-ways-connect-students-break/